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Features. Columns. Book Essays. Insightful author conversations. Commentaries.


#BlackMentalHealth. Issues at Intersection of ethnicity, culture, and faith. Motherhood/parenting. Race & family.

More Talk with Dr. Monica Coleman about her 'Bipolar Faith' — OURSELVES BLACK

A reliable truism of mental health wisdom is that every issue started somewhere. Often a specific problem is a culmination of traumas, emotional shocks, and profound hurts and losses. Someone close is seriously hurt or dies, a child is molested or attacked, a lover brutally betrays. What happens next reveals the paradox of mental health in the black community: critical and deep-rooted issues, even though they are so familiar, don’t get talked about very much at all. Yes, the events are relived s

A Conversation with Dr. Monica Coleman about Bipolar Faith: A Black Woman's Journey with Depression and Faith —

Black folks are making progress with mental health. Yes, there is still stigma but it is slowly being chipped away by cultural and media forces that are gaining momentum and strength with each new moment of public transparency (Kid Cudi, Ricky Williams), each honest and humane depiction of mental illness (The Secret She Kept, Lila & Eve), every Twitter or Facebook chat. Along the winding road of progress though is the intersection of faith and mental health/illness. And even for those individual

The time is right for Raise Your Voice.

My son once complained that in effort to build Christian discipleship someone’s always saying what to do but hardly ever suggesting how to do it. In these times when not speaking up and into the culture is becoming less and less of an option for God’s people, a balanced guide, not simply a motivational speaker, for raising our voices for gospel justice is so needed. At first blush, Kathy Khang seems an unlikely candidate to be the guide for raising your voice. Khang is an immigrant woman from S

‘Mother to Son’ Amplifies the Voices of Black Mothers

As he breathed his last obstructed breaths, George Floyd called to the mother who died before him, “Momma! Momma!” Black mothers, in our communal tradition, hear Floyd calling to us, too. George Floyd, Rayshard Brooks, Trayvon Martin, Tamir Rice, Michael Brown not only could have been our sons, but they were our sons. When we hear the news of their deaths, our chests tighten and our tears flow. We are praying with everything in us that our son or husband or nephew isn’t the next name printed on

Our Conversation with Liza Jessie Peterson, Author of All Day: A Year of Love and Survival Teaching Incarcerated Kids at Rikers Island

I recently spoke with Liza Jessie Peterson about her new book, All Day: A Year of Love and Survival Teaching Incarcerated Kids at Rikers Island. Ms. Peterson is a poet, playwright, actress, and educator who loves our children and whose experiences have so much to teach all of us about what's broken in their lives, and how to bring healing and recovery to their lives, and to our community and institutions. This published interview is edited for clarity, length, and readability. OB

Revolution, Among Other Things: A Conversation About Anger, White Privilege, and Cultural Honesty

Revolution, Among Other Things: A Conversation About Anger, White Privilege, and Cultural Honesty In Part 1 of this series, I shared my thoughts and review of Birmingham Revolution: Martin Luther King Jr.’s Epic Challenge to the Church, Edward Gilbreath’s newly-released book, described by him as an “extended reflection on Martin Luther King, Jr., Birmingham, and the church.”[1] After reading Birmingham Revolution, I was eager to know more from Ed. Fortunately, I had the opportunity to talk wit

Revolution Revisited: A Review of Ed Gilbreath's "Birmingham Revolution"

2013 was brimming with special-year anniversary commemorations. We celebrated events and people that have immeasurably shaped and defined our country and society. Perhaps most notably, the 50-year anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s ‘I Have A Dream Speech’ dominated national consciousness by calling to our collective memory an electrifying moment of unity and promise. It’s certainly unquestionable that the Dream speech is worthy of remembrance and celebration. But even before the crowds jamm

Sisters and Citizens, Part 1: An Interview with Melissa Harris-Perry

Sisters and Citizens, Part 1: An Interview with Melissa Harris-Perry For several years, I’ve been particularly interested in what’s happening with women, specifically Black women, especially Black Christian women. And so I have been exploring what it means to occupy each of those spaces, a unified identity that I call BCW (Black Christian women). Questions of identity, markedly so for women of color, are critical because they fundamentally answer many of the determinative inquiries of our live
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